Montgomery Bus Boycott, N.A.A.C.P., and Rosa Parks (1913.02.04)

RosaParks.GaWy-650X400

A civil rights activist whose defiance compelled the Supreme Court to declare that discrimination in public transportation is legally invalid, Rosa Parks was born on this date in 1913.  You are invited to salute Rosa Parks on her birthday during Crosscurrents, 1/04 at 8 am.

I hope that the radio show is good enough for the fine memory of Rosa Parks.  You can let me know by commenting after you listen.  http://www.krnn.org

Ms. Parks was not the first African-American woman to be arrested for refusing to yield her seat on a Montgomery bus.

Nine months before Parks was jailed, 15-year-old Claudette Colvin was the first Montgomery bus passenger to be arrested for refusing to give up her seat for a white passenger. (Parks was involved in raising defense funds for Colvin.) Three other African-American women—Aurelia Browder, Mary Louise Smith and Susie McDonald—also ran afoul of the bus segregation law prior to Parks. The four were plaintiffs in the Browder v. Gayle case that resulted in the Supreme Court ruling bus segregation unconstitutional.

       Rosa Parks was a civil rights activist before her arrest.  Parks was a long-time member of the Montgomery chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), which she joined in 1943.

        Ms. Parks was not sitting in a whites-only section.  Parks was sitting in the front row of a middle section of the bus open to African Americans if seats were vacant. After the “whites-only” section filled on subsequent stops and a white man was left standing, the driver demanded that Parks and three others in the row leave their seats. While the other three eventually moved, Parks did not.

Rosa Parks quotes

*  You must never be fearful about what you are doing when it is right.

*  Each person must live their life as a model for others.

*  The only tired I was, was tired of giving in.

*  Memories of our lives, of our works and our deeds will continue in others.

*  I believe there is only one race – the human race.

*  Stand for something or you will fall for anything. Today’s mighty oak is yesterday’s nut that held its ground.

*   What really matters is not whether we have problems, but how we go through them. We must keep going on to make it through whatever we are facing.

*  As long as people use tactics to oppress or restrict other people from being free, there is work to be done.

M*A*S*H 4077, Scientific American Frontiers, and Alan Alda (1936.01.28)

20160516GH - CU ENGINEERING, KAVLI INSTITUTE AT CORNELL, Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science - Workshops

A socially conscious performer, director, and writer, best known as Hawkeye in the tv show M*A*S*H, Scientific American Frontiers, and his current podcast “Clear and Vivid,” Alan Alda was  born on this date in 1936.  A diverse playlist will celebrate the equally varied endeavors of Alan Alda on Crosscurrents, 1/28 at 8 am.

   The plan is for the show on Monday to include some edited segments of interviews with Alan Alda in between the tunes designed to celebrate his birthday.  Of course, we hope that teechnology and my editing skills allow us to produce the show in the desigtned manner.

ALAN ALDA SHOW EDIT SHEET

Discussing MASH success

00:01 One of the reason the show works….

…..they really were in a situation that could drive you crazy. 01:03

01:03 The thing that was essential…

…..ah, the truth and the audience got that and appreciated it. 02:07

Discusses censorship

00:00  I did worry about controversy….

…thinly vailed  one tion to politicians. 1:00

How MASH tackled war

We had very funny comedy.

03:17 All kinds,  burlesque, satire…

…recognition. that the war was acid. 03:35

03:35

….not about the Vietnam war. 04:21

Describes the approach to Scientific American Frontiers

It happens in front of them

02 46  And I have to use my acting skills…

……and they are great teachers. 03:53

All we have is now.

Near death experience.

53:04. Well ten years ago…

….I’m really glad to be alive. 54:22

I am hopeful for communication

So much communication over text. Are we hopeless?

16:18. I see some hope…

 It was the only way I could talk to you. The door was closed.  17:14

Dr. Dolittle, Talk To The Animals, and Hugh Lofting (1886.01.14)

hughlofting.gawy_650x400

The author of eccentric physician, Dr. Dolitttle, who learned to dialogue with animals, Hugh Lofting was born on this date 1886.  Even without talking to animals, you can listen to KRNN for an indie animal band playlist on Crosscurrents, 1/14 at 8 am.

Hugh Lofting Quotes:

                 “Some people you will always have about you whom you can trust, and no man these days can boast of more than that. Remember them; forget the others.”  ― Hugh Lofting

               “Money is a terrible nuisance. But it’s nice not to have to worry.”― Hugh Lofting, The Story of Doctor Dolittle

                     “Great decisions often take no more than a moment in the making.”― Hugh Lofting, The Voyages of Doctor Dolittle

                   There has always been a tendency to classify children almost as a distinct species.~Hugh Lofting

Corfu Island, British Conservationist, and Gerald Durrell (1925.01.07)

durrell.gawy_650x400

His love for animals began as a boy while living on the island of Corfu, he gained international stature as a wildlife conservationist, Gerald Durrell was born on this day in 1925.   “Someone told me it’s all happening at the zoo” to which you are invited on Crosscurrents, 1/07 at 8 am.  GERALD DURRELL ON KRNN, 1/07:

QUOTES AND SUCH:

     There is no first world and third world. There is only one world, for all of us to live and delight in.

      A house is not a home until it has a dog.

      In conservation, the motto should always be ‘never say die’.

     “The uncivilized behavior of some human beings in a zoo has to be seen to be believed.”

      “In my experience it is always the most innocent-looking creatures that can cause you the worst damage.”

 

Manchester United FC, British Football, and Sir Alex Ferguson (1941.12.31)

AlexFerguson.GaWy_658x400

A famous British football manager who led Manchester United to 30 domestic and international championships, Alex Ferguson was born on this date in 1941.  Sir Alex’s Manchester playlist to which you are invited will be heard, not at Old Trafford’s pitch, rather at KRNN’s Crosscurrents, 12/31 at 8 am.

ALEX FERGUSON ON KRNN, 12/31: live on-air link:  http://www.ktoo.org/listen/krnn/

Classic Sir Alex Ferguson Quotes

Love him or hate him, one thing is irrefutable, namely that Fergie was brilliant when it came to turning a phrase. He was always prepared to give the media a witty remark or cutting aside. His comments could irritate those on the receiving end.  Sir Alex is now retired.  We celebrate his birthday with a retrospective os some of his best quotes….

No.1 “I can’t believe it. I can’t believe it. Football – Bloody hell !!!”  2009, and Fergie is almost lost for words after United’s incredible last-gasp turnaround over Bayern Munich in the Champions League final.

No.2 “It’s getting tickly now – squeaky-bum time, I call it.”Fergie introduced one of football’s now classic lines back in 2003 when battling it out at the end of the season with Arsenal.

No.3 “Sometimes you have a noisy neighbour. You cannot do anything about that. They will always be noisy. You just have to get on with your life, put your television on and turn it up a bit louder.”  2009, and one of Fergie’s most famous line’s is directed towards the new buying-power of Manchester City.

No.4 “My greatest challenge is not what is happening right at this moment, my greatest challenge was knocking Liverpool right off their f***ing perch. And you can print that.”  Sir Alex Ferguson on overhauling Liverpool’s record number of title victories.

No.5 “If I’d tried it 100 times or a million times, it wouldn’t happen again. If it did, I would carry on playing.”  2003, Fergie talk’s about the on the natorious kicked boot that hit David Beckham and cut open his eyebrow.

No.6 “Sometimes you look in a field and you see a cow and you think it’s a better cow than the one you’ve got in your own field. It’s a fact. Right? And it never really works out that way.”  2010 – Fergie contemplates the rationale for Wayne Rooney’s request for a transfer.

No.7 “Once you bid farewell to discipline you say goodbye to success”

No.8 “You cannot lead by following.”

No.9 ..you learn more from defeats than you do from victories”

No.10 “I never had a problem reaching a decision based on imperfect information. That’s just the way the world works.”

No.11 “If you need one person to change your destiny, then you have not built a very solid organisation.”

No.12 “Don’t lie, don’t steal and always be early.”

No.13 “If my parents were still alive, they would be very proud. They gave me a good start in life, the values that have driven me, and the confidence to believe in myself.”

Christmas Truce of 1914, Silent Night at the Western Front, and Soldiers Sing in No Man’s Land (1914.12.24)

Truce.GaWy_650x400

WHAT REALLY HAPPENED IN THE CHRISMAS TRUCE OF 1914?

A popular Christmas story

In the summer of 1914, thousands of young men from all over the British Empire signed up to fight in the First World War.

They went to war thinking the fighting would not last long and they would be home by Christmas, but by December, it was pretty clear that was not going to happen.

The war had reached a bloody stalemate. All along the Western Front, the opposing troops were dug into trenches with just a few yards of no man’s land between them.

But on Christmas Eve, something extraordinary happened – the soldiers on both sides just stopped fighting. And even more incredibly, as these photographs show, German and British troops left their trenches to spend Christmas together.

The Christmas Truce of 1914 is often celebrated as a symbolic moment of peace in an otherwise devastatingly violent war. We may like to believe that for just one day, all across the front, men from both sides emerged from the trenches and met in No Man’s Land to exchange gifts and play football. But first-hand testimonies help us get closer to what really happened.

Along the Western Front, a scattered series of small-scale ceasefires did happen between some German and British forces. But this brief festive reprieve was far from a mass event. Where it didn’t occur, 25 December 1914 was a day of war like any other. Where it did, accounts suggest that men sang carols and in some cases left their trenches and met in No Man’s Land.

However, the motivations for such events were complex – practical as much as ‘magical’ – and this wasn’t the first unofficial truce to take place. Instead, it was to be one of the last. 

Call for peace

The arrival of December 1914 was proof, if any were needed, that the war would not be ‘over by Christmas’. For the men at the front, months of tough fighting were to be followed by a festive period away from home.

Back in Britain, German battleships shelled the coastal towns of Whitby, Hartlepool and Scarborough, killing 122 and injuring 450 civilian men, women and children. On the Western Front, fierce fighting took place in the Ypres Salient, leading to the deaths of many soldiers. It was the recovery and burial of these casualties which gave rise to the practical need for a cessation of fighting at certain areas of the front, like Ploegsteert Wood, which the British soldiers called ‘Plugstreet’.

On 7 December, Pope Benedict XV had proposed a wider official ‘Truce of God’ in which all hostilities would cease over the Christmas period. The authorities rejected the idea but were keen to maintain morale and bring at least some festive cheer to those at the front.

Throughout the month, 460,000 parcels and 2.5 million letters were sent to British soldiers in France. King George V sent a card to every soldier, and his daughter, Princess Mary, lent her name to a fund which sent a small brass box of gifts, including tobacco or writing sets, to serving soldiers. General Haig even records in his diary for 24 December: “Tomorrow being Xmas day, I ordered no reliefs to be carried out, and troops to be given as easy a time as possible”.

‘Live and let live’: unofficial truces

One of the soldiers sticks a board in the air. As soon as this board goes up all firing ceases…

By November 1914, it had become clear that the war was not going to be over quickly. As autumn turned to winter, the last of Britain’s professional soldiers, exhausted after months of vicious fighting, settled into the routine of life in the trenches of northern France.

They naturally began to think of enemy soldiers – sometimes a few feet away – doing the same. As a result of this proximity a ‘live and let live’ attitude developed in certain areas of the trench system.

          Reciprocal periods of ‘quiet time’ emerged when soldiers tacitly agreed not to shoot at each other. Between battles and out of boredom, soldiers began to banter, even barter for cigarettes, between opposite sides. Informal truces were also agreed and used as an opportunity to recover wounded soldiers, bury the dead and shore up damaged trenches. In many ways, for the last of the professional soldiers, this was all part of the etiquette of war.

However, the High Command feared the longer-term impact of such activity and issued strict orders that officers should be vigilant against this kind of contact – regarding it as treason.

Yet this early on in the war, and across such a large front, these truces were simply a practicality – and certainly not unique to Christmas.

Christmas Eve: Silent Night

By Christmas Eve itself, the damp weather gave way to the cold and a festive frost settled on certain places at the front. As the main night of celebration in Germany, candles and trees went up along parts of the German line.

And as darkness fell, the entrenched German and British soldiers engaged in a carol sing-off.

Presents, kick-abouts and funerals

Along parts of the front, some men responded to the events of Christmas Eve by tentatively emerging from their trenches into No Man’s Land on Christmas Day. Where it happened, enemy soldiers did indeed meet and spend Christmas together.

Spontaneously, they exchanged gifts and took photos – but it was importantly an opportunity to leave the damp of the trenches and tend to the dead and wounded of No Man’s Land. There wasn’t a single organised football match between German and British sides. There may have been small-scale kick-abouts – but these were just one of many different activities men took the time to enjoy.

Meanwhile, in other places along the front, like Yser, bloody battles took place over the Christmas period and those that dared to come above the parapet were met not by gifts but gunfire. Belgian, Indian and French troops who witnessed episodes of fraternisation were at best puzzled and at worst very angry that British troops were being friendly towards the Germans.

The Generals’ reaction

General Sir Horace Smith-Dorrien – commander of British 2nd Army Corps Expeditionary Force – issued strict warnings to his senior officers about preventing fraternisation with enemy soldiers.

Reports and photographs of these small-scale unofficial ceasefires reached the papers back home – and the military authorities.

High Command was angry – they feared that men would now question the war, and even mutiny, as a result of fraternising with the enemy that they were meant to defeat. Stricter orders were issued to end such activity – with harsh punishment for any man caught refusing to fight.

The London Rifle Brigade’s War Diary for 2 January 1915 recorded that “informal truces with the enemy were to cease and any officer or [non-commissioned officer] found to having initiated one would be tried by Court Martial.”

As the war continued, brutal developments on the battlefield changed the character of war in 1915. The enemy were further demonised and fraternisation made even less likely.

The small truces of 1914 never happened again. Yet despite the best efforts of the authorities, the story was out there – in the media and in the popular imagination. A story that has been re-told and re-shaped many times in the decades that followed.

(story and text taken from BBC website)

Kitty Hawk, Wright Brothers, and First Flight (1903.12.17)

WrightBros.GaWy2_edited-1_650x400

 On the sand dunes near Kitty Hawk, NC, the Wright Brothers made the first controlled flight of a self-propelled, heavier-than-air aircraft on this date in 1903.

                You are invited to take flight with brothers Orville and Wilbur for a “bands of brothers” playlist on Crosscurrents, 12/17 at 8 am….and hear the following bro’s

Beach Boys: Brian, Dennis and Carl Wilson

The Allman Brothers Band: Duane and Gregg Allman

The Vaughan Brothers: Jimmie and Stevie Ray

Sunnyboys: Peter and Jeremy Oxley

The Undertones: Damian and John O’Neill

Crowded House: Neil and Tim Finn

Kings of Leon: Caleb, Nathan and Jared Followill

The Kinks: Dave and Ray Davies

The Black Crowes: Chris and Rich Robinson

Sly and the Family Stone: Sly and Freddie Stone

The Proclaimers: Charlie and Craig Reid

The Everly Brothers: Don and Phil Everly

Brothers … Neville, Chambers, Homes, and Isely

Cowboy Junkies: Michael and Peter Timmins (with sister Margo Timmins)

10 Things You May Not Know About the Wright Brothers

  1. Thanks to a coin toss, Orville was the first brother airborne.

The brothers tossed a coin to see who would first test the Wright Flyer on the sands of Kill Devil Hills, North Carolina. Older brother Wilbur won the toss, but his first attempt on December 14, 1903, was unsuccessful and caused minor damage to the aircraft. Three days later, Orville, in coat and tie, lay flat on his stomach on the plane’s lower wing and took the controls. At 10:35 a.m., the Wright Flyer moved down the guiding rail with Wilbur running alongside to balance the delicate machine. For 12 seconds, the aircraft left the ground before touching down 120 feet away in the soft sands. The brothers exchanged turns at the controls three more times that day, and each flight covered an increasing distance with Wilbur’s final flight lasting nearly a minute and covering a distance of 852 feet.

  1. A toy launched their flying obsession.

When the brothers were youngsters in 1878, their father returned home one evening with a gift that he tossed into the air. “Instead of falling to the floor, as we expected,” the brothers recalled in a 1908 magazine article, “it flew across the room till it struck the ceiling, where it fluttered awhile, and finally sank to the floor.” The model helicopter made of cork, bamboo and paper and powered by a rubber band mesmerized the boys and sparked their passion for aviation.

  1. Neither brother received a high school diploma.

Wilbur finished four years of high school, but the family moved from Richmond, Indiana, to Dayton, Ohio, before he could receive his diploma. Orville, although intellectually curious, dropped out of high school before his senior year to launch a printing business.

  1. The Wright brothers once printed a daily newspaper together.

Wilbur eventually joined Orville’s printing business, and in 1889 the brothers began to publish a weekly newspaper, the West Side News. The following year, they published a short-lived daily newspaper, The Evening Item. In 1892 they switched gears and opened the Wright Cycle Company, a successful bicycle repair and sales shop that financed their flying experiments.

  1. The brothers never married.

The tight-knit brothers, born four years apart, were wedded to their work; Wilbur told reporters that he didn’t have time for both a wife and an airplane.

  1. The Wright brothers flew together just one time.

Orville and Wilbur had promised their father, who feared losing both sons in an airplane accident, they would never fly together. The father made a single exception, however, on May 25, 1910, and allowed the brothers to share a six-minute flight near Dayton with Orville piloting and Wilbur the passenger. After landing, Orville took his 82-year-old father on his first and only flight. As Orville gained elevation, his excited father cried out, “Higher, Orville, higher!”

  1. After the first day airborne, the 1903 Wright Flyer never flew again.

The brothers made four flights in the Wright Flyer on December 17, 1903, and as Orville and Wilbur stood discussing the final flight, a sudden strong gust of wind caught hold of the aircraft and flipped it several times. The aircraft sustained such heavy damage to its ribs, motor and chain guides that it was beyond repair. The Wright Flyer was crated back to Dayton and never flew again.

  1. Orville was involved in the first fatal aviation accident.

After their success in 1903, the Wright brothers continued their aircraft development. They marketed their two-passenger Wright Military Flyer to the U.S. Army, which required a demonstration. On September 17, 1908, Orville took to the air for a demonstration flight at Fort Myer, Virginia, with Army Signal Corps Lieutenant Thomas Selfridge as a passenger. Just a few minutes into the flight, the propeller suddenly disintegrated, the aircraft spiraled out of control and it smashed into the ground at full speed. Rescuers pulled an unconscious Selfridge from the wreckage, and the lieutenant died hours later. Orville was hospitalized for six weeks after suffering a broken leg, four broken ribs and a back injury that impaired him for the rest of his life.

  1. For decades, Orville refused to donate the Wright Flyer to the Smithsonian Institution.

The 1903 Wright Flyer is one of the most popular exhibits at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum, but for decades Orville refused to donate the aircraft to the national institution. In 1914, the Smithsonian attempted to restore the reputation of its former secretary Samuel Langley—whose experiments with his Langley Aerodrome ended in failure nine days before the Wright brothers first left the ground—by altering the aircraft and then concluding it was the first machine “capable” of manned flight. A furious Orville loaned the Wright Flyer overseas to the London Science Museum in 1925, believing it to be “the only way of correcting the history of the flying machine, which by false and misleading statements has been perverted by the Smithsonian Institution.” After the Smithsonian admitted in the 1940s to misrepresenting the Langley Aerodrome, Orville agreed to donate the aircraft to the institution. It finally arrived at the Smithsonian in 1948, nearly a year after Orville’s death.

  1. Neil Armstrong carried a piece of the Wright Flyer with him to the moon.

When another aeronautical pioneer from Ohio, Neil Armstrong, became the first man to step foot on the moon in 1969, inside his spacesuit pocket was a piece of muslin fabric from the left wing of the original 1903 Wright Flyer along with a piece of wood from the airplane’s left propeller.

THE WRIGHT FLYER

The Wright brothers inaugurated the aerial age with the world’s first successful flights of a powered heavier-than-air flying machine. The Wright Flyer was the product of a sophisticated four-year program of research and development conducted by Wilbur and Orville Wright beginning in 1899. After building and testing three full-sized gliders, the Wrights’ first powered airplane flew at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, on December 17, 1903, making a 12-second flight, traveling 36 m (120 ft), with Orville piloting. The best flight of the day, with Wilbur at the controls, covered 255.6 m (852 ft) in 59 seconds.

The Wrights pioneered many of the basic tenets and techniques of modern aeronautical engineering, such as the use of a wind tunnel and flight testing as design tools. Their seminal accomplishment encompassed not only the breakthrough first flight of an airplane, but also the equally important achievement of establishing the foundation of aeronautical engineering.

Allowing 200 pounds for the propulsion system, they estimated that the aircraft with pilot would weigh 625 pounds. Based on this estimate, they calculated power, thrust, and speed requirements and concluded they needed an 8-horsepower engine generating 90 pounds of thrust to achieve a minimum airspeed of 23 miles per hour.

A reproduction of the Wright brothers’ preliminary sketch of the 1903 Wright Flyer, drawn in pencil on brown wrapping paper. The notations are in Wilbur’s handwriting. The original is at the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia.

Seeking a power plant for their airplane, the Wrights contacted many of the dozens of firms that by then were manufacturing gasoline engines. Ten responded, but none could meet power and weight Trequirements the Wrights specified, or could do so at a reasonable price. Undeterred, the brothers decided to build their own.

The engine was cooled by water from a narrow vertical water reservoir mounted on a forward strut. The system was not a radiator in the typical sense, for the water did not circulate. The reservoir simply replenished the water jacket as the water evaporated from it.

The aluminum crankcase: A first

The Wright engine, with its aluminum crankcase, marked the first time this breakthrough material was used in aircraft construction. Lightweight aluminum became essential in aircraft design development and remains a primary construction material for all types of aircraft.

Making the propellers

Conceiving the aerodynamic propeller was another example of the Wrights’ great ability to think visually and turn abstract ideas into working hardware. The Wrights decided to use two, slow-turning, large propellers, because this arrangement offered great efficiency, and the propellers could be spun in opposite directions to neutralize the gyroscopic effects of the whirling blades.

Each propeller was 8 feet in diameter and made from two laminations of 1-inch spruce. The blades were shaped with a hatchet and a drawknife and the tips covered with fabric and varnished to prevent splitting.

Chain-and-Sprocket transmission system

Wilbur and Orville again drew upon their familiarity with bicycles in creating the transmission linkage. To transfer power from the engine to the propellers, they devised a simple chain-and-sprocket arrangement running from the engine crankshaft to a pair of steel propeller shafts. To make the propellers rotate in opposite directions, they simply twisted one of the two chains in a figure eight.

A small complement of instruments recorded flight data. A Richard anemometer and a stopwatch were mounted on the front strut to the pilot’s right. They recorded distance through the air in meters and the duration of the flight, readings from which airspeed could be calculated. A Veedor revolution counter was mounted at the base of the engine to record engine revolution.

The instruments were arranged so all could be turned off, along with the engine, the instant the flight was over by a single movement of a wooden lever mounted on the lower wing.

The Wrights’ initial confidence waned, however, as they began to confront an unsettling pattern of setbacks. Between technical problems and bad weather, they at times wondered if their self-assured intention to fly the airplane in 1903 was premature.

The grand junction railroad

Because of its size and weight, the Flyer could not be hand launched like the Wright gliders. The brothers built a 60-foot launching rail from four 15-foot two-by-fours laid end to end. To take off, the airplane rode down this track on a small, wheeled dolly or “truck,” as the Wrights called it. The brothers referred to their launching track as the “Grand Junction Railroad.”

Flyer was airborne for only 3 1/2 seconds, but the power of the engine and the responsiveness of the controls bolstered Wilbur’s confidence. He wrote home, “There is now no question of final success.”

With damage repaired, the Flyer was again ready for flight on December 17. The Wrights arose that morning to freezing temperatures and a 27-mile-per-hour wind. At 10:35 a.m., the Flyer lifted off the launching rail with Orville at the controls. The overly sensitive elevator control caused the Flyer to dart up and down as it sailed slowly over the sand, coming to rest with a thud 120 feet from where it had taken off. The flight was short—only 12 seconds—but it was a true flight nevertheless. A human had flown.

       “After a while they shook hands, and we couldn’t help notice how they held on to each other’s hand, sort o’like they hated to let go; like two folks parting who weren’t sure they’d ever see each other again.”

John T. Daniels, Kitty Hawk lifesaving crewman,

recalling the moments before the first flight

Chicago Blues Music and the Halcyon Days of Yore (2018.12.15)

ChicagoBlues.GaWy2

What do Chicago Blues have to do with Halcyon Days of Yore…one might ask?  You are invited to listen our radio show scheduled for Satuday, December 15th at 5:00 pm (Alaska time) on KRNN Juneau Public Radio 102.7 fm or thtough live on air web stream via:

https://www.ktoo.org/listen/krnn/

……. and/or read on:

What is now referred to as the classic Chicago blues style was developed in the late 1940s and early 1950s, taking Delta blues, fully amplifying it, and putting it into a small-band context. Adding drums, bass, and piano (and sometimes saxophones) to the basic string band and harmonica aggregation, the style created the now standard blues band lineup. The form was (and is) flexible to accommodate singers, guitarists, pianists, and harmonica players as featured performers in front of the standard instrumentation. Later permutations of the style took place in the late 1950s and early 1960s, with new blood taking their cue from the lead-guitar work of BB King and T-Bone Walker, creating the popular West Side subgenre (which usually featured a horn section appended to the basic rhythm section). Although the form has also embraced rock beats, it has generally stayed within the guidelines developed in the 1950s and early 1960s.—(Erlewine, et al., eds. All Music Guide to the Blues. 2nd ed. San Francisco: Backbeat Books, 1999.)

Halcyon Days  Adjective
Denoting a period of time in the past that was idyllically happy and peaceful.

December 14: Halcyon Days begin

The Halcyon Days also occur around this time. According to ancient legend, a grieving wife named Halcyon threw herself into the sea upon discovering the drowned body of her beloved husband, Ceyx. The gods took pity on the pair, transforming them into halcyons, a type of kingfisher bird, with the power to still the stormy seas for 14 days near the time of the winter solstice while they hatched their young. (The birds nest by the seas, so calm winds would protect the eggs during this nesting period.)