Continental Congress, Founding Fathers, and Constitution (1787.09.17)

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The product of four months of secret debate, convention delegates signed the final draft of the Constitution on this date in 1787.  You are invited to convene for a unconventional Constitutional celebration on Crosscurrents, 9/17 at 8 am.

CONSTITUTIION DAY ON KRNN, 9/17 http://www.krnn.org

I.  On September 17, 1787, only 39 of the 55 delegates to the Constitutional Convention signed the document.

II.  The original Constitution signed on September 17th and ratified June 21, 1788 is only five pages long.

III. Three Latin phrases appear in the Constitution: pro tempore, ex post facto, and habeas corpus.

IV.  James Madison is viewed as the “Father of the Constitution” despite his misgivings towards some of its content.

V.  The 85 articles of The Federalist were instrumental in getting the Constitution ratified and were written by Madison, Alexander Hamilton, and John Jay.

VI.  The Constitutional Convention lasted from May 25, 1787 through September 17, 1787. George Washington served as president of the Constitutional Convention, but did not speak during any of the proceedings until the Convention’s final day.

VII. During the Convention, George Washington sat in a chair that had a representation of half a sun on the top, which Benjamin Franklin regularly gazed at during troublesome moments of the proceedings. Asked why, he said he was unable to decide if the sun was rising or setting. Only when the Constitution was signed did Franklin decide the sun was rising.

VIII. Franklin, at age 81, was the oldest delegate, and had to be helped to sign his name.

IX.  John Shallus, a clerk for the Pennsylvania General Assembly, physically wrote the Constitution down on parchment paper. The Convention paid him $30 for his services, which is worth about $800 today.

X.  Rhode Island was the only state that refused to send delegates to the Constitutional Convention and was the last state to ratify the Constitution (May 29, 1790).

XI.  One of the Constitutional Convention’s debates was the title of the nation’s Chief Executive. One possible idea: “His Highness the President of the United States of America and Protector of their Liberties.” Eventually everyone settled on “The President of the United States.”

XII. The U.S. Constitution is the shortest governing document of any nation today, and contains only 7 articles and 27 amendments. It is also the oldest; Norway’s comes in second and was codified in 1814.

XIII. Giving comfort to grammar errants everywhere, the official copy of the Constitution contains an incorrect word — Article 1, Section 10 uses “it’s” when it should be “its,” even in 18th-century usage. However, the word “chuse” as used in the Constitution was acceptable at the time. So was the alternative spelling of Pennsylvania, Pensylvania; the Constitution actually uses both spellings.

Paved Road, Coast to Coast, and The Lincoln Highway (1913.09.10)

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  The first paved coast-to-coast US highway, The Lincoln Highway, was opened on this date in 1913.  Your radio is all you need to join for the Lincoln Highway anniversary on Crosscurrents, 9/10 at 8 am.

LINCOLN HYWY ON KRNN. 9/10: live on air link: http://www.krnn.org

The notionof the Lincoln Highway came from Carl Fisher, responsible for the Indianapolis Motor Speedway and Miami Beach. With help from fellow industrialists Frank Seiberling and Henry Joy, an improved, hard-surfaced road was envisioned that would extend almost 3400 miles coast to coast, New York to San Francisco, over the shortest practical route.

The Lincoln Highway Association was formed in 1913 to develope the road using private and corporate donations. The idea was taken up by an enthusiastic public, and many other named roads across the country followed.  American citizens’ desire for improved roads led to the action of the federal government in constucting roads and the creation of numbered U.S. routes in the 1920s.

National Napping Day (2018.03.12)

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Please join us for the sleep-centered blues show on Walkiing The Blues Away, Saturday, the 10th at 5:oo pm on KRNN Juneau fm 102.7.  ( radio link:  http://www.krnn.org  )

National Napping Day is snoozed on the day after the return of daylight saving time to give folks the chance to catch up on the hour of sleep that they lost out on when clocks changed to the spring time.

A Boston University professor, William Anthony, has been credited with the origin of the event in 1999, primarily to emphasize on the import of sleep. Anthony is  reported to have said, “We chose this particular Monday because Americans are more ‘nap-ready’ than usual after losing an hour of sleep to daylight saving time.”

Detroit Michigan, Automobiles, and Antoine Laumet de La Mothe Cadillac (1658.03.05)

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CADILLAC ON CROSSCURRENTS, 3/5:  A heroic explorer of North America to his advocates, or a cheating scoundrel of New France to his opponents, he founded the settlement of Detroit, Antoine Laumet de La Mothe Cadillac was born on this date in 1658.  Gavin and Wyatt invite you to ride along with Detroit inspired tunes for the Cadillac birthday party on Crosscurrents, 3/5 at 8am. ( radio link: http://www.krnn.org )

Winter Olympics 2018 – Hockey

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Gavin:  This contraption looks like a “kennel.”

Wyatt:  You may be correct as I believe it is called a “cage.”

Gavin:  I do not think we are allowed to play tug with these “sticks.”

Wyatt:  It seems obvious that we should “like the luck?”

Gavin:  No, no… the talk is about “ice the puck.”

Winter Olympics 2018 – Bobsled; – Ski Jump

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Wyatt:  Bobsledding sounds like such a happy event.

Gavin:  What I know is that I would be happy to get out of the way.

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Wyatt:  The event is called “ski jumping.”

Gavin:  It seems much more like “ski falling” to me.

Wyatt:  You just need to be patient and concentrate to get down the hill.

Gavin:  My concern is that I do not want to be a patient of the ambulance at the bottom of the hill.

 

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