Saw Doctors’ N17, Irish Proverbs, and St.Patrick Day (2019.03.17)

And I wish I was on the n17
Stone walls and the grass is green
And I wish I was on the n17
Stone walls and the grass is Greenland
Travelling with just my thoughts and dreams

~~~ The Saw Doctors

The stone walls and the grasses green of the N17 in County Mayo inspire Irish Blues for a St. Patrick’s Day show.  You are invited to the blues tunes for green leprechans on WTBA 3/16 at 5 pm.

This image was captured from our drive along the N17 as we listened to tunes from the Saw Doctors. It was a brilliant day and full of smashing memories.

* May you have the hindsight to know where you’ve been, the foresight to know where you are going, and the insight to know when you have gone too far.

• You’ve got to do your own growing, no matter how tall your father was.

• It is often that a person’s mouth broke his nose.

• May the roof above you never fall in and those gathered beneath it never fall out.

• Lose an hour in the morning, and you’ll be looking for it all day.

• (When a friend can’t change a stubborn person’s mind) You might as well be whistling jigs to a milestone.

• Honey is sweet, but don’t lick it off a briar.

• If you buy what you don’t need, you might have to sell what you do.

• Forgetting a debt doesn’t mean it’s paid.

• It is better to spend money like there’s no tomorrow than to spend tonight like there’s no money.

• (To be said of someone who is unhelpful) She’s fit to mind mice at a crossroads.

• It’s easy to halve the potato where there’s love.

• Where the tongue slips, it speaks the truth.

• A good laugh and a long sleep are the two best cures.

• You’ll never plow a field by turning it over in your mind.

• (To be said of someone who outstays their welcome) If that man went to a wedding, he’d stay for the christening.

• Drink is the curse of the land. It makes you fight with your neighbor. It makes you shoot at your landlord—and it makes you miss him.

• If you want to know what God thinks of money, just look at who He gives it to!

• No man ever wore a scarf as warm as his daughter’s arm around his neck.

• A family of Irish birth will argue and fight, but let a shout come from without, and see them all unite.

• (To be said of an unfortunate friend) She is always in the field when luck is on the road.

• There is no luck except where there is discipline.

• In every land, hardness is in the north of it, softness in the south, industry in the east, and fire and inspiration in the west.

• (To be said of someone who is very organized) If he’s not fishing, he’s mending his nets.

• Here’s to a long life and a merry one. A quick death and an easy one. A handsome partner and an honest one. A cold pint and another one!

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Women’s History Month, Quotations, and Dorothy Gish (1898.03.11)

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 A matinee star in the golden age of American film and theatre, Dorothy Gish was born on this date in 1898.  Gish was known for her ability to play inwardly strong roles and serves as inspiration to celebrate Women’s History Month on Crosscurrents, 3/11 at 8 am.

     One might ask why we selected Dorthy Gish to mark Women’s History Month?   The fact is that it is her birthdaty on Monday the 11th which is the day of our radio show.  The less obvious reason is that Dorothy Gish is often overlook which sadly is the case for many women’s history and their civil rights.  We hope to add our voice toward prositive change.

Wisdom From An Eclectic Group of Women

     “I have learned over the years that when one’s mind is made up, this diminishes fear; knowing what must be done does away with fear.” ~ Rosa Parks

“There are still many causes worth sacrificing for, so much history yet to be made.” ~ Michelle Obama

“I raise up my voice — not so I can shout, but so that those without a voice can be heard. We cannot succeed when half of us are held back.” ~  Malala Yousafzai

” Don’t compromise yourself. You are all you’ve got. ~ Janis Joplin

“Cautious, careful people, always casting about to preserve their reputations can never effect a reform.” ~  Susan B. Anthony

“The most difficult thing is the decision to act, the rest is merely tenacity.”  ~ Amelia Earhart

“What you do makes a difference, and you have to decide what kind of difference you want to make.” ~ Jane Goodall

“Learn from the mistakes of others. You can’t live long enough to make them all yourself.” ~ Eleanor Roosevelt

“A surplus of effort could overcome a deficit of confidence.” ~ Sonia Sotomayor

“There are two kinds of people, those who do the work and those who take the credit. Try to be in the first group; there is less competition there.” ~  Indira Gandhi

“We do not need magic to change the world, we carry all the power we need inside ourselves already: we have the power to imagine better.” ~  J.K. Rowling

“If you obey all the rules, you miss all the fun.” ~  Katharine Hepburn

“Everyone has inside of her a piece of good news. The good news is that you don’t know how great you can be, how much you can love, what you can accomplish, and what your potential is.” ~  Anne Frank

“Aging is not ‘lost youth,’ but a new stage of opportunity and strength.”” ~  Betty Friedan

“No country can ever truly flourish if it stifles the potential of its women and deprives itself of the contributions of half of its citizens.” -~ Michelle Obama

Chicago Blues Music and the Halcyon Days of Yore (2018.12.15)

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What do Chicago Blues have to do with Halcyon Days of Yore…one might ask?  You are invited to listen our radio show scheduled for Satuday, December 15th at 5:00 pm (Alaska time) on KRNN Juneau Public Radio 102.7 fm or thtough live on air web stream via:

https://www.ktoo.org/listen/krnn/

……. and/or read on:

What is now referred to as the classic Chicago blues style was developed in the late 1940s and early 1950s, taking Delta blues, fully amplifying it, and putting it into a small-band context. Adding drums, bass, and piano (and sometimes saxophones) to the basic string band and harmonica aggregation, the style created the now standard blues band lineup. The form was (and is) flexible to accommodate singers, guitarists, pianists, and harmonica players as featured performers in front of the standard instrumentation. Later permutations of the style took place in the late 1950s and early 1960s, with new blood taking their cue from the lead-guitar work of BB King and T-Bone Walker, creating the popular West Side subgenre (which usually featured a horn section appended to the basic rhythm section). Although the form has also embraced rock beats, it has generally stayed within the guidelines developed in the 1950s and early 1960s.—(Erlewine, et al., eds. All Music Guide to the Blues. 2nd ed. San Francisco: Backbeat Books, 1999.)

Halcyon Days  Adjective
Denoting a period of time in the past that was idyllically happy and peaceful.

December 14: Halcyon Days begin

The Halcyon Days also occur around this time. According to ancient legend, a grieving wife named Halcyon threw herself into the sea upon discovering the drowned body of her beloved husband, Ceyx. The gods took pity on the pair, transforming them into halcyons, a type of kingfisher bird, with the power to still the stormy seas for 14 days near the time of the winter solstice while they hatched their young. (The birds nest by the seas, so calm winds would protect the eggs during this nesting period.)

The Blue and The Gray on Memorial Day 2018

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The Blue And The Gray

(abridged)
by Francis Miles Finch (1827-1907)

By the flow of the inland river,
Whence the fleets of iron have fled,
Where the blades of the grave-grass quiver,
Asleep are the ranks of the dead:
Under the sod and the dew,
Waiting the judgment-day;
Under the one, the Blue,
Under the other, the Gray….

….No more shall the war cry sever,
Or the winding rivers be red;
They banish our anger forever
When they laurel the graves of our dead!
Under the sod and the dew,
Waiting the judgment-day,
Love and tears for the Blue,
Tears and love for the Gray.

National Napping Day (2018.03.12)

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Please join us for the sleep-centered blues show on Walkiing The Blues Away, Saturday, the 10th at 5:oo pm on KRNN Juneau fm 102.7.  ( radio link:  http://www.krnn.org  )

National Napping Day is snoozed on the day after the return of daylight saving time to give folks the chance to catch up on the hour of sleep that they lost out on when clocks changed to the spring time.

A Boston University professor, William Anthony, has been credited with the origin of the event in 1999, primarily to emphasize on the import of sleep. Anthony is  reported to have said, “We chose this particular Monday because Americans are more ‘nap-ready’ than usual after losing an hour of sleep to daylight saving time.”

Year of the Dog (2018.02.17)

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YEAR OF THE DOG ON WTBA, 2/17:  The Chinese zodiac calendar brought us to the “Year of the Dog” this weekend.  You are invited to join Gavin, Wyatt, and John for a blues show in honor thereof on Walking The Blues Away, KRNN radio, 2/17 at 5 pm. ( radio link:  http://www.krnn.org )

Gavin:  This weekend begins the Year of the Dog.

Wyatt:  Yes indeed.  Loyal and friendly… that’s us.

Gavin:  Does this dog-year deal mean we get more biscuits?

Wyatt:  I just hope there are no firecrackers!

National Umbrella Day (2018.02.10)

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NATIONAL UMBRELLA DAY ON WTBA KRNN RADIO, 02/10:  This national is a time to celebrate an umbrella as the rain falls (or the sun shines) rather than be blue about the rain.  There is no doubt that the blues tunes will be coming down on Walking The Blues Away on KRNN Juneau 2/10 at 5:00 pm.

RADIO LINK:  http://www.krnn.org

“Scath Fearthainne” (it’s Gaelic), means, appropriately enough, rain shadow. If there has ever been a more perfect name for umbrella, we don’t know what it is. make sure one of them is strictly for use in the sun!