April Fools Day: Why, Wherefore, and Music Playlist (2019.04.01)

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All Fools Day (aka April 1st) has a long history though with elusive origins.  Any road, if you fancy a bit of goofiness, then we have a playlist for you on a particularly foolish Crosscurrents, 04/01 at 8 am.

Our Fools Day music playlist will include, among others:  Arrogant Worms, The Beat Farmers, Bob Newhart, Bobby Bare, Brian Regan, CW Mcall, Chas and Dae, Cheech and Chong, Ellen DeGeneres, The Firesign Threatre, George Carlin, Jerry Reed, Jim Gaffigan, Lily Tomlin, Monty Python, Paula Poundstone Peter Sellers, Randy Newman, Roger Miller, Shel Silverstein, Spike Jones, Stan Freberg, Steve Martin, Wolfman Jack, and…. The Wurzels.

One common story dates to the custom to 1564, when France officially reformed its calendar to the contemporary Gregorian type, and thereby altered the celebration of the New Year from the last week of March to 1 January.

In this version of actions, those who sustained the celebration to the end of New Year’s Week on 1 April were ridiculed as fools.

In early Rome, for example, the Hilaria festival celebrated the revival of a demigod with the putting on of disguises; and the medieval Feast of Fools, in which a Lord of Misrule was elected to parody Christian ceremonies, suffered centuries of church censorship.

There is also a British myth, which places the festival’s source in the Nottinghamshire town of Gotham. The story is that in the 13th century, the town’s inhabitants heard that King John could claim any road on which he stepped as his property and so they accordingly declined the monarch’s admission.   When his soldiers arrived to power their way in, the people of Gotham pretended to be lunatics, and King John determined that their madness preordained that the penalty that would have otherwise been meted out would be unfitting.  According to this story, April Fool’s Day celebrates their slyness.

It is also a mysterious as to why the custom expires at noon.  However, it may be that the source of Britain’s deadline might be the 17th century’s well-named Shig-Shag day, when celebrants put oak sprigs in their hats to show loyalty to the monarchy, in reference to Charles II’s hiding in an oak tree.   Those who failed to honor the custom could only be derided until midday.

Saw Doctors’ N17, Irish Proverbs, and St.Patrick Day (2019.03.17)

And I wish I was on the n17
Stone walls and the grass is green
And I wish I was on the n17
Stone walls and the grass is Greenland
Travelling with just my thoughts and dreams

~~~ The Saw Doctors

The stone walls and the grasses green of the N17 in County Mayo inspire Irish Blues for a St. Patrick’s Day show.  You are invited to the blues tunes for green leprechans on WTBA 3/16 at 5 pm.

This image was captured from our drive along the N17 as we listened to tunes from the Saw Doctors. It was a brilliant day and full of smashing memories.

* May you have the hindsight to know where you’ve been, the foresight to know where you are going, and the insight to know when you have gone too far.

• You’ve got to do your own growing, no matter how tall your father was.

• It is often that a person’s mouth broke his nose.

• May the roof above you never fall in and those gathered beneath it never fall out.

• Lose an hour in the morning, and you’ll be looking for it all day.

• (When a friend can’t change a stubborn person’s mind) You might as well be whistling jigs to a milestone.

• Honey is sweet, but don’t lick it off a briar.

• If you buy what you don’t need, you might have to sell what you do.

• Forgetting a debt doesn’t mean it’s paid.

• It is better to spend money like there’s no tomorrow than to spend tonight like there’s no money.

• (To be said of someone who is unhelpful) She’s fit to mind mice at a crossroads.

• It’s easy to halve the potato where there’s love.

• Where the tongue slips, it speaks the truth.

• A good laugh and a long sleep are the two best cures.

• You’ll never plow a field by turning it over in your mind.

• (To be said of someone who outstays their welcome) If that man went to a wedding, he’d stay for the christening.

• Drink is the curse of the land. It makes you fight with your neighbor. It makes you shoot at your landlord—and it makes you miss him.

• If you want to know what God thinks of money, just look at who He gives it to!

• No man ever wore a scarf as warm as his daughter’s arm around his neck.

• A family of Irish birth will argue and fight, but let a shout come from without, and see them all unite.

• (To be said of an unfortunate friend) She is always in the field when luck is on the road.

• There is no luck except where there is discipline.

• In every land, hardness is in the north of it, softness in the south, industry in the east, and fire and inspiration in the west.

• (To be said of someone who is very organized) If he’s not fishing, he’s mending his nets.

• Here’s to a long life and a merry one. A quick death and an easy one. A handsome partner and an honest one. A cold pint and another one!

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