Beekeeping, World Bee Day, and Anton Janša (1734.05.20)

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The Austrian Empress Maria Theresa selected Anton Janša to the job of permanent instructor of apiculture at the new School of Beekeeping in Vienna. He was renowned even before his death in 1773. After 1775, national beekeeping tutors had to impart the topic in harmony with his traditions and approaches.

The Janša family was not wealthy, but three Janša brothers constructed an art studio in a barn, got noted by the village priest, and were sent to Vienna, the capital of the Hapsburg Empire, which ruled Slovenia in this age. One of the brothers became an arts professor. Another became a beekeeper. The royal beekeeper.

The potential for bad jokes are endless, such as “to BEE or not to BEE,” or “That will BEE the day,” or finallly “BEE my guest.”  OK, I realize that I should stop and just BUZZ off.

WORLD BEE DAY ON KRNN, 5/20 at 8am:  The U.N. signifies World Bee Day to coincide with the birthday of Slovenian beekeeper, the pioneer of modern apiculture, Anton Janša born in 1734.  We hope you will “bee” able to “buzz” by to Crosscurrents, 5/20 at 8 am.

Texas Outlaw Music, Singer-Songwriter, and Willie Nelson (1933.04.29)

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HE WROTE “ON THE ROAD AGAIN” ON A BARF BAG.    Nelson’s 1980 hit, “On The Road Again,” was written aboard an airplane—on a barf bag. “I was on an aeroplane with Sydney Pollack and Jerry Schatzberg, who was the director of the movie Honeysuckle Rose,” Nelson told Uncut in 2014. “They were looking for songs for the movie and they started asking me if I had any ideas. I said, ‘I don’t know, what do you want the song to say?’ I think Sydney said, ‘Can it be something about being on the road?’ It just started to click in my head. I said, ‘You mean like, ‘On the road again, I can’t wait to get on the road again?’ They said, ‘That’s great. What’s the melody?’ I said, ‘I don’t know yet.’”

HE HAS BEEN PLAYING THE SAME GUITAR FOR NEARLY 50 YEARS.  Nelson has been playing Trigger, his beloved guitar (which he named after Roy Rogers’ horse), since 1969. “I’ve got to take good care of Trigger,” Nelson told Uncut Magazine in 2014. “He’s had a couple of problems. We’ve had to go in and do some work on the inside, build up the woodwork in there a little bit over the years. But Trigger’s holding up pretty good.”

HE USED TO BE A BIBLE SALESMAN.  Before he became a full-time musician in the mid-1950s, Nelson worked as a cotton picker (a gig he began as a child, working alongside his grandmother), disc jockey, and a Bible salesman.

Quotes:

There is only one map to the journey of life and it lives within your heart.

Once you replace negative thoughts with positive ones, you’ll start having positive results.

Be gentle with your words – you can’t take them back.

Be here. Be present. Wherever you are, be there.

When I started counting my blessings, my whole life turned around.

Three chords and the truth – that’s what a country song is.

I like myself better when I’m writing regularly.

Waylon Jennings and I had a lot of fun recording together.

WILLIE NELSON ON KRNN, 4/29:  His songs endure, his work influences and his music entertains, Willie Nelson was born on this date in 1933. Please join us as Willie’s compositions provide our playlist on Crosscurrents, 4/29 at 8 am.

 

 

Around The World Cruise and Steve Fossett (1944.04.22)

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An adventurer who set more than 100 world records, among them five circumnavigations of the globe, straining the limits of planes, boats and balloons. Steve Fossett was born on this date 1944.  His road trips were extreme and you are invited to road records on Crosscurrents, 4/22 at 8 am.

Steve Fossett set 116 records in five sports, 60 of which remain to this day. Below are some of them
• Between 1993 and 2004, he set 23 official world records in speed sailing

• In 2002, he became the first person to fly around the world alone and non-stop in a balloon, covering 19,428 miles

• As skipper with a 13-member crew, he beat the round-the-world sailing record in 2004, completing the voyage in 59 days and nine hours

• In 2005, he made his first solo non-stop, non-refuelled global circumnavigation in a single-engine plane. There was no refuelling for 67 hours

• In 2006, he broke the record for the longest flight, spending nearly 77 hours in the air and covering more than 25,000 miles

 

Transcendental Phenomenology, Philosophical Science, and Edmund Hurrserl (1859.04.08)

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EDMUND HUSSERL ON KRNN, 4/8:  The founder of Phenomenology, a method for analysis of consciousness through which philosophy attempts to gain the character of a strict science, Edmund Husserl was born on this date 1859.  We invite you to a playlist of psychedelic rock on Crosscurrents, 4/8 at  8 am.

Edmund Gustav Albrecht Husserl was a German philosopher, born in the Chezch Republic who established the academic field of phenomenology. In his initial work, he elaborated critiques of historicism and of psychologism in logic based on analyses of intentionality. In his later work, he sought to develop a systematic foundational science based on the so-called phenomenological reduction. Arguing that transcendental consciousness sets the limits of all possible knowledge, Husserl re-defined phenomenology as a transcendental-idealist philosophy.

QUOTES

To begin with, we put the proposition: pure phenomenology is the science of pure consciousness.

Natural objects, for example, must be experienced before any theorizing about them can occur.

All consciousness is consciousness of something.

The perception of duration itself presupposes a duration of perception.

All perception is a gamble.

EDMUND HUSSERL ON KRNN, 4/8: http://www.krnn.org live on air 8 am Alaska Time.

PLAYLIST TO INCLUDE:  Big Brother/ Janis Joplin; Blue Cheer;  Rhe Blues Magoos;  Buffalo Springfield;  The Byrds; Clear Light; The Electric Prunes; Grateful Dead; Iron Butterfly; Jefferson Airplane; Jimi Hendrix; Moby Grape; New Riders of the Purple Haze; Quicksilver Messenger; The Seeds; Straberry Alarm Clock; and Vanilla Fudge.

King of Scots, Independent Scotland, and Robert The Bruce (1306.03.25)

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Robert the Bruce was one of the most respected warriors of his generation. He was crowned “King Of Scots” on the 25th of March 1305.  Often called ‘Good King Robert’, he is best known for his conquest of the English army under Edward II at Bannockburn in 1314.

ROBERT THE BRUCE ON KRNN, 3/25:  A medieval Caledonia hero securing Scotland’s independence from England, Robert The Bruce was crowned King Of The Scots on this date in 1306.  An all-Scottish playlist awaits you, with no need for an epic battle, and simply by tuning your radio to Crosscurrents, 3/25 at 8 am.

Historians from the Historic Environment Scotland have looked at the lesser known bits of information about the Outlaw King.  (Nicki Scott, cultural resources advisor at HES)

Family Affair

Bruce’s triumph at Bannockburn in 1314 allowed him to demand the return from English captivity of his wife Elizabeth, his daughter Marjorie, his sister Christina, and Robert Wishart, bishop of Glasgow.

King was an Earl as the Prince

Robert the Bruce was Earl of Carrick from 1292 to 1313. This title is now carried by Charles, the Prince of Wales.

Which Side Are You On

Both Robert and his father were faithful to the English king when war broke out in 1296. They even paid deference to Edward I at Berwick. However, eight months later Bruce abandoned his oath and joined the Scottish revolt against Edward, recognising John Balliol as king.

From 1302 to 1304 Robert was again back in English loyalty. His marriage to Elizabeth de Burgh, daughter of the earl of Ulster (part of English-held Ireland) predisposed this change. From 1304 he abandoned Balliol, and intended to take the throne for himself.

A Rebel Landlord

As well as the earldom of Carrick and the lordship of Annandale, Bruce had title to land in the Carse of Gowrie, Dundee, and the Garioch in Aberdeenshire.

Before the Wars it was fairly common for Scots to hold English lands. Records show that Bruce held lands in Durham and other large English estates. In 1306, Edward I seized the honour of Huntingdon from Bruce.

Hoping For A Celtic Kingdom

In 1315, Robert’s younger brother Edward led an excursion to Ireland. His aim was to takeover the Dublin-based English government and become the High King of Ireland.

Robert joined his brother with a considerable force in 1317. However, bad weather, famine, and disease forced the Scots to retreat when they reached Limerick. Edward held on in the north until he was defeated and killed in 1318.

A Peace Treaty, Young Marriage, Payment, Independence

As per the terms of the 1328 Treaty of Edinburgh, making peace between Scotland and England, Robert’s son David (aged 4) was wedded to Edward III’s sister Joan (aged 7).

Other terms of the treaty saw Scotland agree to pay England £20,000 to end the war and England recognise Scotland’s independence with Robert I as king.

 Land For Support

More than 600 written acts by Bruce have endured, including charters, brieves, letters and treaties.

Most of these documents are grants or confirmations of property. This was a key way that Bruce satisfied individuals and families who had supported him.

A Wee Bit Of Representation

During Robert’s reign, parliament grew into a slightly more representative of the community of the kingdom. Bruce beckoned a small number of burgesses from each royal burgh to attend sessions in 1312 and 1326, after which it became normal exercise.

Particiapatory Journalism and George Plimpton (1927.03.18)

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An author known for his “participatory journalism” including sports and theatre, George Plimpton was born on this day in 1927.  Our playlist of music covers celebrates Plimpton who covered professions on Crosscurrents, 3/18 at 8 am. You are invited to engage in some “paticipatory radio” by tuning into the show on live on-air stream through the wehsite at http://www.krnn.org

GEORGE PLIMPTON QUOTES and LIFE

“I have never been convinced there’s anything inherently wrong in having fun. ”

“Well, I have to write. A lot of people forget that. They think I’m sort of crazy baffoon who can’t make up his mind what to do in life.”

“I never understood people who don’t have bookshelves.”

“At the base of it was the urge, if you wanted to play football, to knock someone down, that was what the sport was all about, the will to win closely linked with contact.”

++++++++++++++

NYT OBIT edit 27 Sept 2003

George Ames Plimpton was born on March 18, 1927, in New York.

Many of Mr. Plimpton’s books dealt with his adventures, most notably ”Out of My League” (1961), on baseball; ”Paper Lion” (1966), on football; and ”The Bogey Man” (1968), on golf.

As a ”participatory journalist,” Mr. Plimpton believed that it was not enough for writers of nonfiction simply to observe; they needed to immerse themselves in whatever they were covering. For example, football huddles and conversations on the bench constituted a ”secret world,” he said, ”and if you’re a voyeur, you want to be down there, getting it firsthand.”

All of this contributed to the charm of reading about Mr. Plimpton’s career as dilettante par excellence — ”professional” athlete, stand-up comedian, movie bad guy, circus performer and many other trades — which he described elegantly in nearly three dozen books.

As a boxer, he had his nose bloodied by Archie Moore at Stillman’s Gym in 1959. As a major league pitcher, he became utterly exhausted and couldn’t finish the inning at an exhibition game between National and American League all-stars in 1959 (though he managed to get Willie Mays to pop up). And as a ”professional” third-string quarterback with the Detroit Lions, he lost roughly 30 yards during a scrimmage in 1963. On Sunday Mr. Plimpton was in Detroit for a 40th-anniversary reunion with the players who once lined up with ”a 36-year-old free-agent quarterback from Harvard.”

He also tried his hand at tennis (Pancho Gonzalez beat him easily), bridge (Oswald Jacoby outmaneuvered him) and golf. With his handicap of 18, he lost badly to Arnold Palmer and Jack Nicklaus.

In a brief stint as a goal tender for the Boston Bruins, he made the mistake of using his gloved hand to catch a flying puck, which caused a nasty gash in his pinky. He failed as an aerialist when he tried out for the Clyde Beatty-Cole Brothers Circus. As a symphonist, he wangled a temporary percussionist’s job with the New York Philharmonic. He was assigned to play sleigh bells, triangle, bass drum and gong; he struck the last so hard during a Tchaikovsky chestnut that Leonard Bernstein, who was trying to conduct the piece, burst into applause.

And he didn’t always fall on his face. One night in 1997 (too old by then to engage in strenuous contact sports), he showed up at the Apollo Theater in Harlem, which was then having its amateur night. He announced that he was an amateur, and when asked what he was going to play, replied, ”the piano.” He knew only ”Tea for Two” and a few other tunes, but played his own composition, a rambling improvisation he called ”Opus No. 1.” The audience adored him, and the charmed judges gave him second prize.

In 1983 he scored another success when he volunteered to help the members of the Grucci family plan and execute a fireworks display to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Brooklyn Bridge. They accepted his kind offer, and he did his job without destroying himself or any of the Gruccis. For a time, he was regarded as New York City’s fireworks commissioner, the bearer of a highly unofficial title with no connection to the city government. In 1984 he wrote a book on his love of the rockets’ red glare, called ”Fireworks: A History and Celebration.”

Perhaps his career was best summarized by a New Yorker cartoon in which a patient looks at the surgeon preparing to operate on him and demands, ”How do I know you’re not George Plimpton?’

Rules Of Evidence, Hearsay, and John Henry Wigmore (1863.03.04)

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The scholar whose book Wigmore On Evidence is an often cited legal treatise, John Henry Wigmore was born on this date in 1863.   Our playlist of evidentiary rules of hearsay tunes will be offered for your consideration on Crosscurrents, 3/04 at 8 am.

    You are invited to tune in at 8 am Alaska Time Monday the 4th of March on air or through the net http://www.krnn.org

     Here is a show for anybody who is studying for the Bar Exam, or who has in the past done so.  Yes, the Rules of Evidence meet the craziness of our radio show.  As an “offer of proof” and in an effort to avoid any “objections”… we submit a play list to include:

Rule 803. Exceptions to the Rule Against Hearsay

The following are not excluded by the rule against hearsay, regardless of whether the declarant is available as a witness:

(1) Present Sense Impression. I FEEL GOOD.  SAD AND LONELY FEELING .

(2) Excited Utterance.   I GET SO EXCITED.  IM SO EXCITED. 

(3Then-Existing Mental, Emotional, or Physical Condition. COUNTRY STATE OF MIND.  THIS STATE OF MIND

(4) Statement Made for Medical Diagnosis or TreatmentDONT CALL NO AMBULANCE.  EMERGENCY CALL.

(5) Recorded Recollection.  AMNESIA.  ROCK AND ROLL NEVER FORGETS 

(6) Records of a Regularly Conducted Activity. DO IT AGAIN.  HERE IT GOES AGAIN 

As the expression goes in legal circles:

…may it please the court????

Phonograph, Record Sock Hop, and Thomas Edison (1847.02.11)

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With over 1000 patents for his innovations, Thomas Edison was born on this date in 1847.  You are invited to a record rock hop honoring Thomas Edison inventor of the phonograph (and thereby all record hop dances) on Crosscurrents, 2/11 at 8 am.

THOMAS EDISON ON  KRNN, 2/11 at 8 am (Alaska Time)

live on air stream link:    https://www.ktoo.org/listen/krnn/

     If you fancy 1950’s and 1960’s sock hop music and enjoy reflecting on the innovations of Thomas Edison on his birthday, then we have a show for you.  Among the craziness will include:

Telephone – Hello Baby,  LaBamba, That’ll Be The Day
Motion Picture – SiIhoettes, I Only Have Eyes For You
Car Battery – Rocket 88, Speedo
Microphone – Wall Of Sound
Phonograph – At The Hop, Land Of 1,000 Dances, Let’s Dance
Wizard of Menlo Park – Duke Of Earl
World of Innovations – What A Wonderful World

Montgomery Bus Boycott, N.A.A.C.P., and Rosa Parks (1913.02.04)

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A civil rights activist whose defiance compelled the Supreme Court to declare that discrimination in public transportation is legally invalid, Rosa Parks was born on this date in 1913.  You are invited to salute Rosa Parks on her birthday during Crosscurrents, 1/04 at 8 am.

I hope that the radio show is good enough for the fine memory of Rosa Parks.  You can let me know by commenting after you listen.  http://www.krnn.org

Ms. Parks was not the first African-American woman to be arrested for refusing to yield her seat on a Montgomery bus.

Nine months before Parks was jailed, 15-year-old Claudette Colvin was the first Montgomery bus passenger to be arrested for refusing to give up her seat for a white passenger. (Parks was involved in raising defense funds for Colvin.) Three other African-American women—Aurelia Browder, Mary Louise Smith and Susie McDonald—also ran afoul of the bus segregation law prior to Parks. The four were plaintiffs in the Browder v. Gayle case that resulted in the Supreme Court ruling bus segregation unconstitutional.

       Rosa Parks was a civil rights activist before her arrest.  Parks was a long-time member of the Montgomery chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), which she joined in 1943.

        Ms. Parks was not sitting in a whites-only section.  Parks was sitting in the front row of a middle section of the bus open to African Americans if seats were vacant. After the “whites-only” section filled on subsequent stops and a white man was left standing, the driver demanded that Parks and three others in the row leave their seats. While the other three eventually moved, Parks did not.

Rosa Parks quotes

*  You must never be fearful about what you are doing when it is right.

*  Each person must live their life as a model for others.

*  The only tired I was, was tired of giving in.

*  Memories of our lives, of our works and our deeds will continue in others.

*  I believe there is only one race – the human race.

*  Stand for something or you will fall for anything. Today’s mighty oak is yesterday’s nut that held its ground.

*   What really matters is not whether we have problems, but how we go through them. We must keep going on to make it through whatever we are facing.

*  As long as people use tactics to oppress or restrict other people from being free, there is work to be done.

M*A*S*H 4077, Scientific American Frontiers, and Alan Alda (1936.01.28)

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A socially conscious performer, director, and writer, best known as Hawkeye in the tv show M*A*S*H, Scientific American Frontiers, and his current podcast “Clear and Vivid,” Alan Alda was  born on this date in 1936.  A diverse playlist will celebrate the equally varied endeavors of Alan Alda on Crosscurrents, 1/28 at 8 am.

   The plan is for the show on Monday to include some edited segments of interviews with Alan Alda in between the tunes designed to celebrate his birthday.  Of course, we hope that teechnology and my editing skills allow us to produce the show in the desigtned manner.

ALAN ALDA SHOW EDIT SHEET

Discussing MASH success

00:01 One of the reason the show works….

…..they really were in a situation that could drive you crazy. 01:03

01:03 The thing that was essential…

…..ah, the truth and the audience got that and appreciated it. 02:07

Discusses censorship

00:00  I did worry about controversy….

…thinly vailed  one tion to politicians. 1:00

How MASH tackled war

We had very funny comedy.

03:17 All kinds,  burlesque, satire…

…recognition. that the war was acid. 03:35

03:35

….not about the Vietnam war. 04:21

Describes the approach to Scientific American Frontiers

It happens in front of them

02 46  And I have to use my acting skills…

……and they are great teachers. 03:53

All we have is now.

Near death experience.

53:04. Well ten years ago…

….I’m really glad to be alive. 54:22

I am hopeful for communication

So much communication over text. Are we hopeless?

16:18. I see some hope…

 It was the only way I could talk to you. The door was closed.  17:14