Peanuts, Snoopy, and Charles M. Schulz (1922.11.26)

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The creator and cartoonist of the globally-popular “Peanuts” characters, Charles M. Schulz was born on this date in 1922.  We hope you avoid the doghouse and follow us to the Schulz birthday on Crosscurrents, 11/26 at 8 am.

Charles M. Schulz on KRNN, 11/26 at 8 am live on air link:  http://www.krnn.org

QUOTES:

As Charlie Brown
1. “My anxieties have anxieties.” (9 November 1968)
2. “Nothing takes the taste out of peanut butter like unrequited love!” (15 Dec 1964)
3. “Sometimes I lie awake at night, and I ask, ‘What can I do to keep my life from going by so fast?’ Then a voice comes to me that says, ‘Try slowing down at the corners.'” (30 July 1996 )
4. “I’ve developed a new philosophy. I only dread one day at a time.” (8 August 1966)
5. “How can I say the right thing and the wrong thing at the same time?” (11 September 1985)
6. “I’m not a poor loser, I’m a good loser. I’m so good at it I lose all the time!” (2 August 1998)

As Snoopy
1. “My mind reels with sarcastic replies.” (12 October 1971)
2. “Yesterday I was a dog. Today I’m a dog. Tomorrow I’ll probably still be a dog. *sigh!* There’s so little hope for advancement.” (15 February 1958)
3. Beauty Tips – How to Look Younger: Don’t be born so soon.” (4 May 1982)
4. “(Writes a new book on theology:) I have the perfect title… Has It Ever Occurred to You That You Might Be Wrong?” (9 August 1976)

As Linus van Pelt
1. “Big sisters are the crab grass in the lawn of life!” (17 June 1961)
2. “Never jump into a pile of leaves with a wet sucker.” (15 November 1957)
3. “I love mankind – it’s people I can’t stand!” (12 November 1959)
4. “There are three things I have learned never to discuss with people…religion, politics and the Great Pumpkin!” (25 October 1961)
5. “You can’t bluff an old theologian!” (6 December 1972)

As Lucy van Pelt
1. “Don’t let your team down by showing up!” (16 April 1963)
2. “These five fingers: individually they’re nothing, but when I curl them together like this into a single unit, they form a weapon that is terrible to behold!” (5 January 1964)
3. “In all of mankind’s history, there has never been more damage done than by people who “thought they were doing the right thing.” Five cents, please.” (18 November 1971)

As Sally Brown
1. “Happiness is having your own library card.” (26 April 1964)
2. “Some philosophies take a thousand years. I think of them in two minutes.” (15 April 1997)
3. “Light travels at a speed of 186,000 miles per second. … So why are the afternoons so long?” (1 June 1976)
4. “Life in the village was peaceful until the volcano interrupted.” (15 May 1998)

All you need is love. But a little chocolate now and then doesn’t hurt.
Happiness is a warm puppy.
Life is like a ten speed bicycle. Most of us have gears we never use.
Just remember, once you’re over the hill you begin to pick up speed.
I have a new philosophy. I’m only going to dread one day at a time.
Don’t worry about the world coming to an end today. It is already tomorrow in Australia.
I love mankind; it’s people I can’t stand.
Life is like an ice-cream cone, you have to lick it one day at a time.
No problem is so big or so complicated that it can’t be run away from!
Sometimes I lie awake at night, and I ask, ‘Where have I gone wrong’. Then a voice says to me, ‘This is going to take more than one night.

 

Roaring 1920’s, The Lost Generation, and F.Scott Fitzgerald (1896.09.24)

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 An author whose life was a tragic example of the 1920’s – the joys of love and success, and the pain of excess and failure, F. Scott Fitzgerald was born on this date in 1896.  Please bring your dancing shoes for an electric swing playlist and a Fitzgerald birthday party on Crosscurrents, 9/24 at 8 am.

F.SCOTT FITZGERALD ON KRNN, 9/24 live on air:  http://www.krnn.org

Fitzgerald quotes

So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

The loneliest moment in someones life is when they are watching their whole world fall apart, and all they can do is stare blankly.”― F. Scott Fitzgerald

Show me a hero, and I’ll write you a tragedy.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald

I don’t want to repeat my innocence. I want the pleasure of losing it again.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, This Side of Paradise

And I like large parties. Theyre so intimate. At small parties there isnt any privacy.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

I was within and without, simultaneously enchanted and repelled by the inexhaustible variety of life.” ― Fitzgerald F. Scott, The Great Gatsby

Let us learn to show our friendship for a man when he is alive and not after he is dead.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

Whenever you feel like criticizing any one…just remember that all the people in this world haven’t had the advantages that you’ve had.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald

Reserving judgements is a matter of infinite hope.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

Cut out all these exclamation points. An exclamation point is like laughing at your own joke.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald

Here’s to alcohol, the rose colored glasses of life.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Beautiful and Damned

Never confuse a single defeat with a final defeat.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald

It’s a great advantage not to drink among hard drinking people.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

First you take a drink, then the drink takes a drink, then the drink takes you.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald

It takes two to make an accident.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

There is no confusion like the confusion of a simple mind…” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

I’m a cynical idealist.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, This Side of Paradise

I’ve been drunk for about a week now, and I thought it might sober me up to sit in a library.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby

It is not life that’s complicated, it’s the struggle to guide and control life.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, This Side of Paradise

Experience is the name so many people give to their mistakes.” ― Francis Scott Fitzgerald, This Side of Paradise

In any case you mustn’t confuse a single failure with a final defeat.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, Tender Is the Night

What people are ashamed of usually makes a good story.” ― F Scott Fitzgerald

My God,’ he gasped, ‘you’re fun to kiss.” ― Fitzgerald, Tender Is the Night

I am tired of knowing nothing and being reminded of it all the time.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, Tender Is the Night

One should . . . be able to see things as hopeless and yet be determined to make them otherwise.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald

Vitality shows not only in the ability to persist, but in the ability to start over.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald

Sometimes I don’t know whether I’m real or whether I’m a character in one of my novels.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald

Everybody’s youth is a dream, a form of chemical madness.’

‘How pleasant then to be insane!” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Diamond as Big as the Ritz, and Other Stories

Very well then, better a sane crook than a mad puritan.” ― F. Scott Fitzgerald, Tender Is the Night

Ours was a generation grown up to find all gods dead, all wars fought, all faiths in man shaken” —” ― F.Scott Fitzgerald

Great Society, Vietnam War, and Lyndon B. Johnson (1908.08.27)

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The 36th President lauded for his progressive domestic policies and criticized for his foreign affairs, Lyndon B. Johnson was born on this date in 1908.  You are invited to join the LBJ birthday with a historical review and Texas tunes on Crosscurrents, 8/27 at 8 am.

LYNDON B. JOHNSON ON KRNN, 8/27: Live On Air Link – http://www.krnn.org

LBJ  QUOTATIONS:

“Yesterday is not ours to recover, but tomorrow is ours to win or lose.”

“Books and ideas are the most effective weapons against intolerance and ignorance.”

“If we stand passively by while the centre of each city becomes a hive of depravation, crime and hopelessness…if we become two people, the suburban af”fluent and the urban poor, each filled with mistrust and fear for the other…then we shall effectively cripple each generation to come.”

“There are no problems we cannot solve together, and very few we can solve by ourselves.”

“We can draw lessons from the past, but we cannot live in it.”

“A man without a vote is a man without protection.”

“Don’t Spit in the Soup, We All Gotta Eat”

“Democracy is a constant tension between truth and half-truth and, in the arsenal of truth, there is no greater weapon than fact.”

“Being president is like being a jackass in a hailstorm. There’s nothing to do but to stand there and take it.”

“Poverty must not be a bar to learning and learning must offer an escape from poverty.”

We have talked long enough in this country about equal rights. … It is time now to write the next chapter-and to write it in the books of law.

“Light at the end of the tunnel We don’t even have a tunnel we don’t even know where the tunnel is.”

“You know, doing what is right is easy. The problem is knowing what is right.”

Sharpshooter, Frontier Woman, and Annie Oakley (1860.08.13)

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A sure rifle shot who became a national celebrity, Annie Oakley was born on this date in 1860.  Take accurate aim at an adorably ambitious all around airplay archive about Annie activated anthology album and age anniversary on Crosscurrents, 8/13 at 8 am.

ANNIE OAKLEY ON KRNN, 8/13:  live on-air link: http://www.krnn.org

TRIVIA:

Annie Oakley was not her real name. 

The fifth of seven surviving children, Oakley was born Phoebe Ann Moses on August 13, 1860, in rural Darke County, Ohio. Although she became a Wild West folk hero, the sharpshooter spent her entire childhood in the Buckeye State. Called “Annie” by her sisters, she reportedly chose Oakley as her professional surname after the name of an Ohio town near her home.

Oakley proved an expert shot at a young age.  

Annie tagged along with her father as he hunted and trapped in the woods. From an early age, Annie showed an extraordinary talent for marksmanship. “I was eight years old when I made my first shot,” she later recalled, “and I still consider it one of the best shots I ever made.” Steadying her father’s old muzzle-loading rifle on a porch rail, she picked off a i a local grocery store.

She outgunned a professional sharpshooter—and then married him. 

A Cincinnati hotelkeeper arranged a shooting contest between 15-year-old Annie and a traveling professional sharpshooter named Frank Butler who regularly challenged local marksmen as he toured the country. Butler, who reportedly chuckled when he first saw his opponent, hit 24 out of 25 targets. The teenager hit all 25. After winning the shooting match, Annie won Butler’s heart. The two married the following summer and remained wedded for 50 years.

Oakley offered to raise a shooting women to fight in the Spanish-American War. 

on April 5, 1898, Oakley penned a note to President William McKinley. The performer told the president that she felt confident that his good judgment would prevent war from breaking out between the United States and Spain before adding: “But in case of such an event I am ready to place a company of fifty lady sharpshooters at your disposal. Every one of them will be an American and as they will furnish their own arms and ammunition will be little if any expense to the government.” That offer and a similar one Oakley made during World War I were not accepted.

Her name is synonymous with free tickets.

In the late 1800s and early 1900s, ushers traditionally punched a hole or two in free tickets to the circus, theater or sporting events in order to differentiate them from those of paying customers when tabulating receipts. The pock-marked tickets resembled the playing cards that Oakley would shoot holes through during her performances, which led to free admissions being referred to as “Annie Oakleys.” According to the Dickson Baseball Dictionary, the term also became a part of baseball lingo to refer to a walk because it was a “free pass” to first base.

Thanks to Thomas Edison, she became a movie star.

In 1888, Oakley acted in Deadwood Dick, a financially unsuccessful play. At the Paris Exposition the next year, though, she met Buffalo Bill Cody’s friend Thomas Edison. In 1894, Oakley visited Edison in New Jersey and showed off her shooting skills for the inventor’s Kinetoscope. The resulting film, called The Little Sure Shot of the Wild West, featured Oakley shooting a rifle to break glass balls. Although she didn’t continue acting in film, she did act in The Western Girl, a play in which she portrayed a sharpshooter, in 1902 and 1903.

QUOTES:

         “Aim at a high mark and you’ll hit it. No, not the first time, nor the second time. Maybe not the third. But keep on aiming and keep on shooting for only practice will make you perfect.”

              “For me, sitting still is harder than any kind of work.”

            “I ain’t afraid to love a man. I ain’t afraid to shoot him either.”

Sewing Machine, Inventor, and Elias Howe (1819.07.09)

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An inventor who revolutionized garment manufacturing with his patented stitching machine, Elias Howe was born on this date in 1819.  You can tune up your sewing machine while you seamlessly listen on your radio to the Howe birthday on Crosscurrents, 7/9 at 8 am.

ELIAS HOWE ON CROSSCURRRENTS, 7/9: live on air link: http://www.krnn.org

Playlist to include:  In My Own Fashion; Sharp Dressed Man; A Lawyer And A Draper; Her Strut; Needles And Pins; A Good Idea At The Time; Heart Machine; Silver Thread And Golden Needles; Ain’t No Easy Way; and Pincussion… among others.

Equal Protection of the Law; Liberty For All; and Thurgood Marshall (1908.07.02)

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 An advocate for civil rights when  appeared before, and served on, the U.S. Supreme Court, Thurgood Marshall was born on this date in 1908.  You are invited to join the concurring opinion before the radio court of tunes for the Marshall birthday on Crosscurrents, 7/2 at 8 am.    Live on air link: http://www.krnn.org

His words are relevant today as a reminder to us all:

At a time in our history when the streets of the Nation’s cities inspire fear and despair, rather than pride and hope, it is difficult to maintain objectivity and concern for our fellow citizens. But, the measure of a country’s greatness is its ability to retain compassion in time of crisis. No nation in the recorded history of man has a greater tradition of revering justice and fair treatment for all its citizens in times of turmoil, confusion, and tension than ours. This is a country which stands tallest in troubled times, a country that clings to fundamental principles, cherishes its constitutional heritage, and rejects simple solutions that compromise the values that lie at the roots of our democratic system.

                ~~~ Furman v. Georgia, 408 U.S. 238, Concurring opinion (January 17, 1972

America must get to work. In the chilled climate in which we live, we must go against the prevailing winds. We must dissent from the indifference. We must dissent from the apathy. We must dissent from the fear, the hatred, and the mistrust. We must dissent from a nation that buried its head in the sand waiting in vain for the needs of its poor, its elderly, and its sick to disappear and just blow away. We must dissent from a government that has left its young without jobs, education, or hope. We must dissent from the poverty of vision and timeless absence of moral leadership. We must dissent, because America can do better, because America has no choice but to do better.

               ~~~ Speech delivered on September 6, 1990, before the Annual Judicial Conference of the Second Circuit, quoted in Supreme Justice Speeches and Writings Thurgood Marshall. Edited by J. Clay Smith, Jr., 2002

The legal system can force open doors, and sometimes-even knock down walls, but it cannot build bridges. That job belongs to you and me. The country can’t do it. Afro and White, rich and poor, educated and illiterate, our fates are bound together. We can run from each other, but we cannot escape each other. We will only attain freedom if we learn to appreciate what is different, and muster the courage to discover what is fundamentally the same. America’s diversity offers so much richness and opportunity. Take a chance, won’t you? Knock down the fences, which divide. Tear apart the walls that imprison you. Reach out. Freedom lies just on the other side. We shall have liberty for all.

             ~~~ Speech delivered on September 6, 1990, before the Annual Judicial Conference of the Second Circuit, quoted in Supreme Justice Speeches and Writings Thurgood Marshall. Edited by J. Clay Smith, Jr., 2002

Customary greeting to Chief Justice Warren E. Burger, What’s shaking, chiefy baby?

           ~~~ Source: quoted by M.D. Davis and H.R. Clark in Thurgood Marshall: Warrior at the Bar, Rebel on the Bench, 1992