Animal Farm, 1984, and George Orwell (1903.06.25)

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An English novelist most known for his satirical works “Animal Farm” and “1984”, George Orwell was born on this date in 1903.  You will find no “doublethink” and that “all animals are equal” on the KRNN farm to which you are invited for an Orwellian birthday playlist on Crosscurrents, 6/25 at 8am.  ORWELL ON CROSSCURRENTS, 6/25: stream live via the web:  http://www.krnn.org

GEORGE ORWELL QUOTES

“All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others.”
― George Orwell, Animal Farm

“In a time of deceit telling the truth is a revolutionary act.”
― George Orwell, 1984

Perhaps one did not want to be loved so much as to be understood.”
1984

 “Who controls the past controls the future. Who controls the present controls the past.”
― 1984

 “In a time of deceit telling the truth is a revolutionary act.”
― George Orwell

 “War is peace.
Freedom is slavery.
Ignorance is strength.”
― 1984

 “All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others.”
Animal Farm

 “Every generation imagines itself to be more intelligent than the one that went before it, and wiser than the one that comes after it.”
― George Orwell

 “The best books… are those that tell you what you know already.”
1984

 “The creatures outside looked from pig to man, and from man to pig, and from pig to man again; but already it was impossible to say which was which.”
― Animal Farm

 “If you want to keep a secret, you must also hide it from yourself.”
― 1984

“The most effective way to destroy people is to deny and obliterate their own understanding of their history.”
― George Orwell

 “It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen.”
― 1984

 “If you want a picture of the future, imagine a boot stamping on a human face—for ever.”
― 1984

“We shall meet in the place where there is no darkness.”
― 1984

 “But if thought corrupts language, language can also corrupt thought.”
―  1984

 “Political language is designed to make lies sound truthful and murder respectable, and to give an appearance of solidity to pure wind. ”
― George Orwell

 “Doublethink means the power of holding two contradictory beliefs in one’s mind simultaneously, and accepting both of them.”
― 1984

“If liberty means anything at all, it means the right to tell people what they do not want to hear.”
― George Orwell

“Until they become conscious they will never rebel, and until after they have rebelled they cannot become conscious.”
― 1984

“The choice for mankind lies between freedom and happiness and for the great bulk of mankind, happiness is better.”
― 1984

“One does not establish a dictatorship in order to safeguard a revolution; one makes the revolution in order to establish the dictatorship.”
1984

“There was truth and there was untruth, and if you clung to the truth even against the whole world, you were not mad.”
― 1984

“If you kept the small rules, you could break the big ones.”
1984

“We are the dead. Our only true life is in the future.”
― 1984

“Can you not understand that liberty is worth more than just ribbons?”
―  Animal Farm

“If both the past and the external world exist only in the mind, and if the mind itself is controllable – what then?”
1984

“He was a lonely ghost uttering a truth that nobody would ever hear.”
― 1984

“Until they become conscious, they will never rebel”
― 1984

“In general, the greater the understanding, the greater the delusion; the more intelligent, the less sane.”
― 1984

“If there is hope, it lies in the proles.”
― 1984

“You must try harder. It is not easy to become sane.”
“Those who control the present, control the past and those who control the past control the future.”
― 1984

“Those who control the present, control the past and those who control the past control the future.”
―  1984

“The past was erased, the erasure was forgotten, the lie became the truth.”
―  1984

“The past was erased, the erasure was forgotten, the lie became the truth.”
― 1984

Mount Everest, Climber, and George Mallory (1886.06.18)

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MALLORY ON CROSSCURRENTS, 6/18: Renowned mountaineer leading three British expeditions to Mount Everest, George Mallory was born on this date in 1886.  You can be your own mountain by joining our Mallory radio party on Crosscurrents, 6/18 at 8 am.

Playlist to include:  Aint No Mountain High Enough;  A Higher Place; Hold On I’m Coming;  I Can’t Help Myself;  Hang On Sloopy;  You’ll Be Coming Down;  Come Together;  Let’s Stay Together;  Reach Out I’ll Be There;  and… Stand By Me.

 

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British Monarch, American Revolution, and King George III (1738.06.04)

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KING GEORGE III ON CROSSCURRENTS, 6/4:  The British monarch presiding over the loss of the American Revolution, King George III was born on this day in 1738.  Including a playlist of some of unusual British 60’s mod musicians, America’s last monarch has a birthday party to which you are welcome is celebrated on Crosscurrents, 6/4 at 8 am.

  1. HOME GROWN:  George III became heir to the throne on the death of his father in 1751, succeeding his grandfather, George II, in 1760. He was the third Hanoverian monarch and the first one to be born in England and to use English as his first language.

  2. BUSY MAN:  George III was devoted to his wife, Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz. They had 15 children, 13 of whom reached adulthood.

  3. GEORGE, THE SCIENCE GUY:  George III was the first king to study science as part of his education (he had his own astronomical observatory), and examples of his collection of scientific instruments can now be seen in the Science Museum.

  4. WIN SOME, LOSE SOME:  The American War of Independence ran from 1775 to 1783 and resulted in Britain’s loss of many its colonies in North America. France was eager to retaliate against Great Britain following their defeat during the Seven Years’ War.

  5. HE LIKED A GOOD RIDE:  In 1760 George III commissioned the Gold State Coach is an enclosed, eight horse-drawn carriage still used by the British Royal Family today.

  6. FOLLOW THE MONEY: George III’s accession in 1760 marked a significant change in royal finances. In 1760, it was decided that the whole cost of the Civil List (judges and embassadors etc.) should be provided by Parliament, in return for the surrender of the hereditary revenues by the King from the Crown Estate for the duration of his reign.

  7. ROYAL REAL ESTATE KING:  George III bought Buckingham House (now known as Buckingham Palace) in 1761 for his wife Queen Charlotte to use as a comfortable family home close to St James’s Palace, where many court functions were held. Buckingham House became known as the Queen’s House.

  8. PAPER BACK WRITER:  One of the most cultured of monarchs, George III started a new royal collection of books (65,000 of his books were later given to the British Museum, as the nucleus of a national library) and opened his library to scholars.

  9. DUKE OF DIRT:  During his reign, George III acquired the nickname ‘Farmer George’, in part due to his agricultural interests and in part as a playful pun.

  10. HOSPITALIZATION;  After serious bouts of illness in 1788-89 and again in 1801, George became permanently deranged in 1810. He was mentally unfit to rule in the last decade of his reign; his eldest son – the later George IV – acted as Prince Regent from 1811. Some medical historians have said that George III’s mental instability was caused by a hereditary physical disorder called porphyria.

 

Philosophy, Academey, and Plato (428.05.21 around about)

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PLATO ON CROSSCURRENTS, 5/21:  Founder of the institute of higher learning, The Academy, a writer on politics, metaphysics, and epistemology, the ancient Greek philosopher, Plato was born around about, according to some historical calculations, on this date in the year 428.  The philosophy of our show will be musicology as we celebrate Plato’s scholarship on Crosscurrents, 5/21 at 8 am.

Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a harder battle.” ― Plato

“Every heart sings a song, incomplete, until another heart whispers back. Those who wish to sing always find a song. At the touch of a lover, everyone becomes a poet.” ― Plato

“Wise men speak because they have something to say; fools because they have to say something.” ― Plato

“We can easily forgive a child who is afraid of the dark; the real tragedy of life is when men are afraid of the light.” ― Plato

“Only the dead have seen the end of war.” ― Plato

“The price good men pay for indifference to public affairs is to be ruled by evil men.”― Plato

“Do not train a child to learn by force or harshness; but direct them to it by what amuses their minds, so that you may be better able to discover with accuracy the peculiar bent of the genius of each.” ― Plato

“The heaviest penalty for declining to rule is to be ruled by someone inferior to yourself.” ― Plato, The Republic

Love is a serious mental disease.” ― Plato, Phaedrus

“I am the wisest man alive, for I know one thing, and that is that I know nothing.” ― Plato, The Republic

“Never discourage anyone…who continually makes progress, no matter how slow.” ― Plato

“One of the penalties of refusing to participate in politics is that you end up being governed by your inferiors.” ― Plato

“good people do not need laws to tell them to act responsibly, while bad people will find a way around the laws” ― Plato

“Ignorance, the root and stem of every evil.” ― Plato

“I’m trying to think, don’t confuse me with facts.” ― Plato

“If women are expected to do the same work as men, we must teach them the same things.” ― Plato, The Republic

“There is truth in wine and children” ― Plato, Symposium / Phaedrus

“The measure of a man is what he does with power.

Those who tell the stories rule society.” ― Plato

“Human behavior flows from three main sources: desire, emotion, and knowledge. ” ― Plato

“The madness of love is the greatest of heaven’s blessings” ― Plato

“Education is teaching our children to desire the right things.” ― Plato

Courage is knowing what not to fear.” ― Plato

“Whe men speak ill of thee, live so as nobody may believe them.” ― Plato

“There are two things a person should never be angry at, what they can help, and what they cannot.” ― Plato

“You should not honor men more than truth.” ― Plato

The beginning is the most important part of the work.” ― Plato, The Republic

“The object of education is to teach us to love what is beautiful.”

Plato,

“Necessity is the mother of invention.” ― Plato

“A house that has a library in it has a soul.” ― Plato

“Death is not the worst that can happen to men.” ― Plato

“The greatest wealth is to live content with little.” ― Plato

Hamlet, Macbeth, and William Shakespeare (1564.04.23-ish)

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A poet and playwright whose drama and comedy works are among the most well known in the English language, William Shakespeare was born on this date in 1564.  His birthday on the 23rd is estimated (ish) based on his church baptism was documented on the 26th.  You are invited to the Shakespeare birthday to be held (not at the Globe Theatre) but rather at the KRNN Crosscurrents show 4/23 at 8 am.  ( http://www.krnn.org )

A Sample of William Shakespeare “Big Hit” One-Liners:

HAMLET ~~~

“To be, or not to be: that is the question”. – (Act III, Scene I).

AS YOU LIKE IT ~~~

“The fool doth think he is wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a fool”. – (Act V, Scene I)

“All the world ‘s a stage, and all the men and women merely players. They have their exits and their entrances; And one man in his time plays many parts” – (Act II, Scene VII).

RICHARD III ~~~

“A horse! a horse! my kingdom for a horse!”. – (Act V, Scene IV).

ROMEO AND JULIET ~~~

“For you and I are past our dancing days” . – (Act I, Scene V).

THE MERCHANT OF VENICE ~~~

“But love is blind, and lovers cannot see”

THE MERRY WIVES OF WINDSOR ~~~

“As good luck would have it”. – (Act III, Scene V).

JULIES CAESAR ~~~

Cry “Havoc,” and let slip the dogs of war”. – (Act III, Scene I)

MACBETH ~~~

“If chance will have me king, why, chance may crown me”. – (Act I, Scene III)

KING LEAR ~~~

“Nothing will come of nothing.” – (Act I, Scene I).

“I am a man more sinned against than sinning”. – (Act III, Scene II).

 

Comedian, Silent Film and Charlie Chaplin (1889.04.16)

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The British comedian, writer, and director who was unforgettable for his clever portrayal of man’s tragic-comic struggles with fate, Charlie Chaplin was born on this date in 1889.  The birthday of Charlie Chaplin is a chance to celebrate his work’s joyful inspiration on Crosscurrents, 4/16 at 8 am.  http://www.krnn.org

THE KID 1921
The Tramp cares for an abandoned child, but events put that relationship in jeopardy.
     Chaplin’s first full-length feature is a silent masterpiece about a little tramp who discovers a little orphan and brings him up but is left desolate when the orphanage reclaims him. Chaplin directed, produced and starred in the film, as well as composed the score.
MODERN TIMES 1936
The Tramp struggles to live in modern industrial society with the help of a young homeless woman.
     This comedic masterpiece finds the iconic Little Tramp (Charlie Chaplin) employed at a state-of-the-art factory where the inescapable machinery completely overwhelms him, and where various mishaps keep getting him sent to prison. In between his various jail stints, he meets and befriends an orphan girl (Paulette Goddard). Both together and apart, they try to contend with the difficulties of modern life, with the Tramp working as a waiter and eventually a performer.
CITY LIGHTS 1931
With the aid of a wealthy erratic tippler, a dewy-eyed tramp who has fallen in love with a sightless flower girl accumulates money to be able to help her medically.
     A hapless but resilient tramp (Charlie Chaplin) falls in love with a blind flower girl (Virginia Cherrill) on the tough city streets. Upon learning that she and her grandmother are to be evicted from their home, the tramp undertakes a series of attempts to provide them with the money they need, all of which end in humiliating failure. But after a drunken millionaire (Harry Myers) lavishly rewards him for saving his life, the tramp can change the flower girl’s life forever.
THE GOLD RUSH 1925
A prospector goes to the Klondike in search of gold and finds it and more.
     In this classic silent comedy, the Little Tramp (Charles Chaplin) heads north to join in the Klondike gold rush. Trapped in a small cabin by a blizzard, the Tramp is forced to share close quarters with a successful prospector (Mack Swain) and a fugitive (Tom Murray). Eventually able to leave the cabin, he falls for a lovely barmaid (Georgia Hale), trying valiantly to win her affections. When the prospector needs help locating his claim, it appears the Tramp’s fortunes may change.
THE IMMIGRANT 1917
Charlie is an immigrant who endures a challenging voyage and gets into trouble as soon as he arrives in America.
     The Immigrant was selected for preservation by the Library of Congressas being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”.[1]
A DOGS LIFE 1917
The Little Tramp and his dog companion struggle to survive in the inner city.
     Charlie rescues a stray from other dogs, and together they meet Edna after finding a wallet full of cash.
THE CIRCUS 1928
The Tramp finds work and the girl of his dreams at a circus.
     Wrongfully accused of criminal acts, a tramp (Charlie Chaplin) unwittingly ducks into a big top, where his bumbling attempts to avoid pursuing police officers earn the laughter and applause of the circus-goers. Impressed, the ringmaster (Allan Garcia) decides to employ the tramp as an entertainer. In between getting trapped in a lion’s cage and partaking in clumsy high wire escapades, he falls for a beautiful show rider (Merna Kennedy), who unfortunately has eyes for a daring tightrope acrobat.