Festivus, For The Rest Of Us, December 23rd

The holiday drew national consideration thanks to Seinfeld. In a 1997 episode titled “The Strike”, which aired during the ninth season, George Costanza’s father, Frank (Jerry Stiller), decided he was performing a solitary war on Christmas. Instead of celebrating a tacky commercialized holiday, Frank was going to start his own occasion—Festivus. “Many Christmases ago, I went to buy a doll for my son,” explained Frank in the show. “I reached for the last one they had, but so did another man. As I rained blows upon him, I realized there had to be another way.” With that, Festivus was born.

The holiday is celebrated on December 23rd, because Frank wanted “to get a leg up on Christmas.” To mark the occasion, an aluminum pole is set up in the living room or backyard—the Festivus pole, which “requires no decoration,” according to Frank. After a Festivus meal, celebrants must air their grievances with each other and engage in feats of strength, like wrestling.

4 thoughts on “Festivus, For The Rest Of Us, December 23rd

  1. Oh my…the airing of grievances is something that unfortunately happens at some Christmas dinners. When I was quite young we joined another family for the dinner. The husband and wife got in a row and the wife got up with her plate of turkey and all the trimmings walked over to the husband and broke the plate over his head!. I couldn’t help myself and burst out laughing. My Father gave me a “look” and I pulled myself together and stopped laughing.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. My goodness, you have a wild memory of a wild holiday dinner. I only have remembrance of “sharp silence” and “chilly tension” by dinner guests…but no broken plates.

      Liked by 1 person

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